The SuperNova Acceleration Probe
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


Images

Cutaway image of SNAP A cutaway illustration of SNAP showing some of the interior optics.
Cutaway image of SNAP A computer generated cutaway illustration of SNAP
Cutaway image of SNAP's primary mirror A computer generated cutaway illustration of SNAP's primary mirror
image of SNAP spacecraft

A computer generated illustration of the SNAP spacecraft

computer generated image of SNAP A computer generated illustration of SNAP
Before-and-after pictures (and Hubble Space Telescope picture) of a high-redshift supernovae discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project in March, 1998. Before-and-after pictures (and Hubble Space Telescope picture) of a high-redshift supernovae discovered in March, 1998. This observaton showed that the expansion of the universe was accelerarting. Credit: High Redshift Supernova Search Supernova Cosmology Project
Top panel:  Hubble Diagram for SCP low-extinction subsample; Bottom panel: Residuals relative to an empty universe. Top panel:  Hubble Diagram for SCP low-extinction subsample; Bottom panel: Residuals relative to an empty universe. Credit: Knop et al 2003.
Confidence regions for Omega_Mass vs Omega_Lambda with results from CMB and galaxy cluster data added. Confidence regions for Omega_Mass vs Omega_Lambda with results from CMB and galaxy cluster data added. Credit: Knop et al 2003, Spergel et al 2003, Allen et al 2002.
Joint measurements of Omega_Mass and w assuming a flat universe and w constant in time. Joint measurements of Omega_Mass and w assuming a flat universe and w constant in time. Credit: Knop et al 2003.
Observed magnitude versus redshift for well-measured distant and (in the inset) nearby type Ia supernovae. Observed magnitude versus redshift for well-measured distant and (in the inset) nearby type Ia supernovae. Credit: Perlmutter et al 2003.
History of cosmic expansion, as measured by the high-redshift supernovae (black data points), assuming flat cosmic geometry. History of cosmic expansion, as measured by the high-redshift supernovae (black data points), assuming flat cosmic geometry. Credit: Perlmutter et al 2003.
Hubble Diagram with 42 High-Redshift Supernovae. Hubble Diagram with 42 High-Redshift Supernovae (Log Redshift scale). Credit: Perlmutter et al 1998.
Confidence Region on Omega_Mass vs. Omega_Lambda Plane. Confidence Region on Omega_Mass vs. Omega_Lambda Plane. Credit: Perlmutter et al 1998.
Age of the Universe Isochrones superposed on Omega_Mass vs. Omega_Lambda Confidence Region. Age of the Universe Isochrones superposed on Omega_Mass vs. Omega_Lambda Confidence Region. Credit: Perlmutter et al 2003.
Confidence Region on Omega_Mass vs. w Plane, for an additional energy density characterized by an equation of state w = p/rho.

Confidence Region on Omega_Mass vs. w Plane, for an additional energy density characterized by an equation of state w = p/rho. Credit: Perlmutter et al 1998.

 


NASA
NASA Space Sciences Directorate
NASA Science Mission Directorate Universe Division
NASA's Beyond Einstein program

DOE
DOE Office of Science
DOE Office of High Energy Physics

CNES
SNAP PIs: Saul Perlmutter and Michael Levi
Responsible SSU Personnel: Lynn Cominsky
Web Curators: Masaaki Yamato
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